Vistage Training Part 2

vistage

CEOs and social media.

(GBR) We're back in Winchester to finish off our consulting contract with the UK branch of Vistage International, the world's foremost chief executive leadership organisation.

Last time it was specific training giving them a grounding in digital media skills and cross-platform understanding, today it’s reviewing their operations, exploring strategies and leaving them with a social media roadmap to go forward.

Mediasnackers don't just know what they're talking about, they make it real. They give examples, tips and techniques. And they personalise it so it's immediately relevant. Another great thing is that they actually use the stuff to to do their work, and so teach others by actually using the technology. If you need to engage experts in the whole social media domain, these guys get it, and they transfer their expertise in a fun, informal and effective way.

Steve Gilroy, Chief Executive

Related post : Vistage Consulting and Vistage Training Part 1

MediaSnackers Consulting

Wales Arts Marketing Symposium

walesarts

Keynoting.

(WAL) This evening I'll be the final keynote speaker at the Wales Arts Marketing Symposium in Cardiff, Arts Council of Wales.

The title of my talk is "How social media has changed the game: the future of new technologies and digital communications for marketing the arts in Wales," fun stuff.

Thanks for providing a most entertaining and enjoyable key note speech to close our Arts Marketing Symposium. Your session was highly relevant and gave us all lots to think about. Most importantly you presented in a lively and fun way, engaging the audience, and leaving them on a high at the end of the day—just what we asked you to do!

Ann Kellaway, Senior Research & Audience Development Officer, Arts Council of Wales

MediaSnackers Speaking/Masterclass

MS Podcast#147 / Rezed Podcast#44

rezednew

The hub for learning and virtual worlds monthly podcast series.

(WORLD) The fortyfourth RezEd monthly podcast, produced by MediaSnackers with Global Kids.

Terrence Cummings, of Linden Lab, Jon Himoff, CEO of Rezzable, and Rich White, of Greenbush Education Service Centerdiscuss their various virtual platforms and how these platforms can be used as educational tools, and an In Focus with Larry Rosenstock, CEO and Founding Principal of High Tech High, speaking about integrating social issues into game design.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

0:00 – 0:24 Intro
0:25-3:57 RezEd news with Amira and Rik from Global Kids (any news or events can be submitted here)
3:58-9:13 In Focus with Larry Rosenstock, CEO and Founding Principal of High Tech High
9:14-10:14 In Dialogue discussing Second Life, Heritage Key and Edusim
10:15-13:27 Terrence Cummings, of Linden Lab, discusses Second Life enterprise and its’ role within education
13:28-16:21 Jon Himoff, CEO of Rezzable, speaks about Heritage Key as an educational tool
16:22-22:14 Rich White, of the Greenbush Educational Center in SE Kansas,talks about Edusim
22:15-27:45 Observations from the field about the various tools
27:46-28:00 Outro
28:01-29:56 Amira and Rik detailing the upcoming events for the RezEd community (any news or events can be submitted here)
29:57-30:05 Outro

itunessubscribeSubscribe directly through iTunes by clicking on this icon (download iTunes for free here).

Not using iTunes? Then just copy / paste this feed and drop it into your aggregating software.

Want to suggest someone or put your virtual hand-up to be interviewed? Then get in touch here.

Devour our other podcasts.

MS Podcast#146

jimmywales

The wikipedia guy.

(WORLD) The MediaSnackers podcast focusses on individuals, organisations or companies who are simply impressing us and which are crying out for more discussion.

Jimmy Wales is the founder of Wikipedia and co-founder of Wikia, talking here about the two projects, their history plus current and future focuses.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

0.00—0.24 intro
0.23—1.09 history of Wikipedia
1.10—2.02 current role (from @podcast_review)
2.03—3.50 growth from non-english language contributions
3.51—5.55 difference between Wikipedia and Wikia
5.56—6.41 focus of different platforms (Tampa Bay Homeless Resource Wiki)
6.42—7.30 how does he manage the roles
7.31—9.17 best/worst thing about having a completely user-generated site (@neil_raygun)
9.18—10.40 if knowledge is no longer power – what is?
10.41—12.12 future
12.13—12.23 thanks and outro

Sound is a bit flaky at the start but gets better as the interview goes on.

itunessubscribeSubscribe directly through iTunes by clicking on this icon (download iTunes for free here).

Not using iTunes? Then just copy / paste this feed and drop it into your aggregating software.

Want to suggest someone or put your virtual hand-up to be interviewed? Then get in touch here.

Devour our other podcasts.

Continue reading MS Podcast#146

The MS Meme #19

meme

Keeping track of the growing MediaSnackers Meme.

(WORLD) We probably weren't the first to apply the 'snacking' metaphor to media, although there seems to be a growing adoption in terms of describing the new media landscape—we thought it would be good to keep an eye on the growing MediaSnacking meme:

Over time, we will find we're no longer a nation that eats media meals. Rather, we’re all-day content snackers—which means we become more source agnostic too.

Steve Rubel talking about the age of the stream

So what's a PR professional to do? For me, the answer is often a social media ‘snack break’.

A fresh look on PR agencies role.

Jason Falls; “People don’t like to read long posts. We are ‘media snackers.'”#blogindiana

Tweeted by robbyslaughter

And the focus mkters do have from mom is summed up as going ‘from mealtime to snacktime’ — media snacking time only post baby #adtechchi

Tweeted by krzimmer

@Szczepanik Hmm. Another media snack. Fattening and unsatisfying. You should blog. Give ’em hell!

Tweeted by BillSledzik

@TaylorBarr how do you feel about social media…snacking? RT @Sean_Flynn: http://bit.ly/QmtCv

Tweeted by paigiamo7

@susan_neonlily Regarding multi-tasking, here is interesting read on HD-ready consumers and our desire for media snacking. http://ow.ly/rQ4K

Tweeted by anngelica

Moms are media snackers. Consume all day along. After becoming a mom Internet use up, TV down #adtechny

Tweeted by JulieDiazAsper

@BenFordham u ought to crash#media140. The baying new media hounds need to be fed legacy media snacks.

Tweeted by thomasrdotorg

OK, I give up on Tweetie for Mac – no filters/columns and no RT – are you kidding?!? iPhone version is just for media snacking.

Tweeted by billshander

@maydbs it’s eaten everyday and a new one made :) micro art/art snacking compare to media snacking = twitter food

Tweeted by martinwezowski

View all ‘MediaSnackers Meme’ posts

Social Media Barriers and Benefits Video

EDtalks

EDtalks to MediaSnackers

EDtalks have placed speaker videos from ULearn09 online and MediaSnackers’ DK gets the ball rolling with our discoveries of barriers and benefits with clients.

DK reveals how once the people are won over, they often get hit by their internal policies and infrastructure issues. He also explains our advantage of working cross sector, benefits clients by being able to see working social media examples from areas of industry that otherwise wouldn’t be accessible to them.

Check out the video or read the full transcript below:

Grab the embed code here.

I’m DK the founder of MediaSnackers, from Wales in the UK.

One of the big things with our clients at the moment is the barrier to entry with social media. A lot of it is attitudinal, institutional sometimes where the policies or strategies that are in place don’t actually encourage creativity and freedom. So a lot of our work is actually to enable people to understand what social media can do for them.

Whether that be making things cheaper, quicker or easier, the next step then is to enable them to use it in some pro-social or productive way.

We work cross sector, we don’t just work with educators, but thats really cool because we nick ideas from other sectors.

So we work with broadcasters, agencies in the commercial sector, and I think thats really good because models of innovation outside your sector are really important. If you are an educator, look at what biscuit brands are doing, look at what car manufacturers are doing, yet don’t look at what they do, look at how they do it.

Once you ask how they are doing it, that creates a model of delivery and once you’ve got that model you can adapt and adopt it into what you are doing, so always look at the benefits.

A lot of our clients (that) are coming to us, look for (assistance with) Twitter streams or FaceBook fan pages, and we try and pull them back from that, because a lot of the focus on there is about output not outcomes.

They know that they want something, or want to use social media because they’ve seen it in the papers or something like that, but they don’t really think about the outcomes, and the outcomes can be simply that they want to drive traffic to their site or drive publicity or promotion to what they are doing.

Most of the time we challenge them to ask if they’ve got the resources and capacity to maintain a Twitter stream. If you’ve got a Twitter stream, what are you going to shout about? If you don’t have a cool weblog or space to link back to you’re just shouting in the crowd and no-ones going to take notice of you.

Social media is about people, it’s not about platforms, it’s not about technology, all that stuff is value neutral – you bring to it what you bring to it. What we want to do with our clients, and maybe as educators as well is focus on the benefits and values for you as an educator, as a school, as an institution.

If you can prove the values and benefits, hopefully the guys up stairs who write your cheques and set the policies will enable you and give you that creative freedom to try and play.

Play is really important, that is how we learn as kids and we forget that as adults we don’t play any more. But social media is set up for ‘play’, with lots of buttons to click and things to explore.

So just play on this stuff, and I’m sure the benefits and values will just spring out at you.

Related post: Ulearn 09